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  1. #11
    Renato Piereck
    Spreading the Saab virus rpiereck's Avatar
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    24 Jul 2011
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    Ansbach, Germany
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    Saab(s)
    '00 9-5 Aero SC, 87 900i 8v
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    Yeah, I'll probably relocate the filter after I come back from my exotic vacation to central Asia. Makes sense abut the pressure sensor by the filter, and yes, the temperature sensor on the drain plug is a bit odd. The wire is there, intact, but still it's the lowest pot on the engine bay. I will shoot the thing with a multimeter to see if tere is continuity between the gauge and the wire. It has to be a simple fix, as it's a very simple system too. The oil pressure and volt meter gauges work fine.

    Since you're pretty knowledgeable with the C900, how I get to the air filter? It seems like it comes out downward, but I could be wrong. Do I have to remove the rubber air intake hose off first? This car sure is mechanically odd, but to me that's part of the appeal.

    This car also making me a better driver, since it has a quarter of a million kilometers on the odometer, I am being careful with the transmission, I already crunched gears a few times but I am improving my driving. Always go into first before revers, I double de-clutch a lot, and heel and toe have become the norm too when downshifting to match the revs. Heel and toe on the C900 is almost natural, the car has great pedal positioning, the NG900 is almost impossible to properly heel and toe unless I put in an accelerator pedal extension.

    Another great thing about this car is how smooth and comfortable it is. My NG900 has Koni shocks, Vogtland springs, poly bushings, and low profile tires so it's not the smoothest ride. I live in rural Germany and most of our roads here are not really smooth, lots of small two lane roads with plenty of pavement patches! On the Classic I don't even feel the patches on the road. WIth the NG900 I am aware of every crevice on the tarmac. Different cars with different souls, I guess!

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    Now: '00 Saab 9-5 Aero Combi - '89 Peugeot 205 CTI - '91 Peugeot 309 GTI
    Gone: '87 Saab 900i - '95 Saab 900 SE Turbo

  2. #12
    Renato Piereck
    Spreading the Saab virus rpiereck's Avatar
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    24 Jul 2011
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    Ansbach, Germany
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    Saab(s)
    '00 9-5 Aero SC, 87 900i 8v
    Thumbs Up:   2
    Well, I just returned from the vehicle inspection, and surprisingly the front tires passed inspection. The right front is right at the wear bars and the left is a sliver higher than the wear bars. The inspector recommended that I replace them soon, but he did not fail the car for the tires, which is what I was expecting.

    He did however fail the car for a burned left side license plate light, and the reverse lights not working (which I hadn't noticed yet). I had noticed the left side license plate light off yesterday. This morning I put a new bulb in it, thinking that's all it needed. Well, now it isn't working. Either the new bulb burned out, or there is no power going to that socket. If the new one burned out it could be there is a ground somewhere that is burning the bulb.

    I am still getting my temporary plates today, and I have 30 days to drive it with the temp plates to fix all the issues and get proper plates. If all goes well I'll have it fixed tonight and the car will pass the inspection tomorrow.

    Other than that the car passed on all the other critical areas: braking, tie rods and wheel bearings, rust, other lights, leaks, idle, etc. He mentioned the hand brake is uneven, with more pull on the right than on the left, but cars don't fail for that. So, I have to adjust my left side parking brake, hopefully that's it.

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    Now: '00 Saab 9-5 Aero Combi - '89 Peugeot 205 CTI - '91 Peugeot 309 GTI
    Gone: '87 Saab 900i - '95 Saab 900 SE Turbo

  3. #13
    Paul A
    Saab Nut
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    11 Mar 2011
    Location
    West London and Wiltshire, UK
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    251
    Saab(s)
    T16 '93 Ruby - T16 '94 Vert Ruby
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Quote Originally Posted by rpiereck View Post
    Either the new bulb burned out, or there is no power going to that socket. If the new one burned out it could be there is a ground somewhere that is burning the bulb.
    You cannot burn a bulb out if it is the correct voltage. The car system is 12v and if the bulb is 12v, you cannot burn it out, unless the bulb is faulty. Either you have a faulty bulb socket, ie corroded, burnt, dirty,or the contact bent, or no power to the socket or a faulty ground. None of these will burn the bulb out. My money is on a faulty socket.

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  4. #14
    Frank
    Administrator nordwulf's Avatar
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    30 Jul 2010
    Location
    USA - Netherlands
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    7,890
    Saab(s)
    previous: 2006 9-3, 2001-06 9-5, 2011 9-4X
    Thumbs Up:   134
    Some people buy souvenirs when they are in a foreign country. Others buy a Saab and plan to take it with them if they move to a new place.

    It looks like you got a great deal, together with a great history and experience. Nice!

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  5. #15
    Renato Piereck
    Spreading the Saab virus rpiereck's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jul 2011
    Location
    Ansbach, Germany
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    Saab(s)
    '00 9-5 Aero SC, 87 900i 8v
    Thumbs Up:   2
    I am loving this car. I had to go to Kellermann SAAB to pick up a coolant temperature sensor for the NG900, we took a detour through the byways.

    Drove a few miles behind a pretty 1950 Benz, I love that smell of incomplete combustion from carburetor cars!

    I am enjoying the rear opening windows on the C900, I love those on a Coupe, haven't seen that since I was a kid. They disappeared when air conditioners became a standard equipment. I had them open all day!

    The joy of this car is driving slow, the opposite of the NG900, which begs to get on the Autobahn.

    Pics from today:

    As "middle of nowhere" as you can get in Germany. Drove through some empty farm roads, all dirt, saw no one for a while but could hear the hum from the Autobahn A6 everywhere. Saw a few deer and a falcon.


    Posing with someone's wood harvest




    Artsy

    0 Not allowed!
    Now: '00 Saab 9-5 Aero Combi - '89 Peugeot 205 CTI - '91 Peugeot 309 GTI
    Gone: '87 Saab 900i - '95 Saab 900 SE Turbo

  6. #16
    Hear my Saab a comin' nuclear944's Avatar
    Join Date
    19 Dec 2010
    Location
    Bulgaria - Eastern Europe
    Posts
    95
    Saab(s)
    Past: 1989 SPG & 1989 900 N/A Sedan
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Yeah those 8 valvers are pretty gutless from what I hear. Still shouldn't be agonizingly bad.
    Don't get used to the idea that the c900 is meant to be driven slow. They are far from it.

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  7. #17
    Renato Piereck
    Spreading the Saab virus rpiereck's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jul 2011
    Location
    Ansbach, Germany
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    1,524
    Saab(s)
    '00 9-5 Aero SC, 87 900i 8v
    Thumbs Up:   2
    They are great on the corners, this car doesn't plow like the NG900 does. And if you wind up that 8v engine she will move. But this car just feels right on a slower, relaxed cruise, not my NG900.

    I was driving on a windy road the other day, with an Audi wagon on my tail, he had no room to pass but I could see he was pushing for it. Then the road went uphill and the curves got a bit tighter. I left the Audi behind, pushing the quarter million kilometer Saab engine, second and third gear all the way up. When I got to the top portion where the Audi could have passed me he was a few car lengths back, not on my bumper anymore. On the way downhill he also didn't have room to pass and stayed there, I left him behind again. At the bottom of the hill I went left, he turned right. Germans love to tail gate and that's what he got for doing it to me, got beat to the top of the hill by an old Swede.

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    Now: '00 Saab 9-5 Aero Combi - '89 Peugeot 205 CTI - '91 Peugeot 309 GTI
    Gone: '87 Saab 900i - '95 Saab 900 SE Turbo

  8. #18
    Sam Carlson
    Tutorial Bot euromobile900's Avatar
    Join Date
    14 Aug 2010
    Location
    Medford, MA
    Posts
    684
    Saab(s)
    '90 900 LPT with a flat-nose conversion
    Thumbs Up:   2
    To change the filter:

    First, you have to remove the rubber bellows from the intake manifold-to-airflow meter (which sits on top of the air filter). A 7mm socket on a 1/4" socket driver (flex-type is great) will help from messing up the slot on the hose clamp that holds it in place.

    Then, set the bellows off to the side while, if applicable, disconnecting it from the deceleration fuel-shut off valve (only on cars with manual gearbox). It's a little black plastic capsule which pops into the bellows and has a wiring plug and a vacuum hose attached to it. The bellows air tempperature. sensor is still attached to the air filter temperature box, don't remove that! Just let the bellows dangle between the radiator and clutch (best if engine is cool).

    Now you've got a better view of things.

    Next, take out the six screws (Phillips head) which fasten the airflow meter/air filter lid (the part that the four fuel lines come out of) onto the air filter housing. Bend it up CAREFULLY and back toward the windshield. Let me say again, BE CAREFUL, or you will break the fragile nylon fuel lines that I mentioned earlier.

    Hold the airflow meter/air filter lid (careful of fuel lines) up with one hand and retrieve the old filter out with the other. Either wipe or vacuum out the air filter housing (bet you'll find a bug collection there) and pop in a new filter--or, see if old one is very dirty, by holding it up to the light and seeing if light will go through it.

    As long as you have the airflow meter/air box apart, you might as well also clean the airflow plate if it needs it. You'll know because you'll see some blackish brown re-circulated exhaust emissions goo deposits on it. It's okay to lift the plate with some pliers on the bolt in it's center. Gooey gas enters the intake manifold, where its deposits ooze down the bellows and onto the airflow plate (which "meters" the air based on how much is rushing past it). Goo can cause airflow plate to stick shut or act sluggishly to incoming air (causing poor or no running).

    Also, that goo collects on the throttle (butterfly) valve in the intake manifold. Take some carburetor cleaner and an old toothbrush and clean that up, too (goo can cause blockage of air past throttle valve and/or valve failing to return to idle position).

    Sorry for the long write-up--it really isn't that hard, I swear!

    And Peva's right about the bulbs--probably just a corroded bulb socket. Classic 900 hatchbacks were notorious for this. Rub it with some sandpaper and it will likely work again!

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    Ask me a question about your c900! I promise I either can answer it or know someone who can

  9. #19
    Renato Piereck
    Spreading the Saab virus rpiereck's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jul 2011
    Location
    Ansbach, Germany
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    1,524
    Saab(s)
    '00 9-5 Aero SC, 87 900i 8v
    Thumbs Up:   2
    Heheh, talk about user friendly!! I'll do the air filter replacement today.

    On the rear bulbs, I already fixed them all. The reverse lights was just a burnt fuse, easy fix. For the license plate light, yes there was corrosion on the bulb mount, which I fixed, and there was also one electrical connector that was loose inside the hatch, I removed the trim panel, and tightened the electrical connection. All is well now.

    0 Not allowed!
    Now: '00 Saab 9-5 Aero Combi - '89 Peugeot 205 CTI - '91 Peugeot 309 GTI
    Gone: '87 Saab 900i - '95 Saab 900 SE Turbo

  10. #20
    Paul A
    Saab Nut
    Join Date
    11 Mar 2011
    Location
    West London and Wiltshire, UK
    Posts
    251
    Saab(s)
    T16 '93 Ruby - T16 '94 Vert Ruby
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Quote Originally Posted by euromobile900 View Post
    Next, take out the six screws (Phillips head) which fasten the airflow meter/air filter lid
    Might I respectfully remind you Sam that there are no "Phillips" head fastenings on a 900. Most of them are "Torx" head as we know. All the rest that are of a + design are in fact "Pozi" (Pozidriv). The fastenings and drivers of Phillips and Pozi are not interchangeable, and if you try you will probably damage both screw and driver. In Europe and Far East (I don't know about the US) the Phillips head is obsolete and replaced by the Pozidriv. The only real problem is many uninformed people still carry Phillips screwdrivers in their toolkits unaware there is a difference and consequently have trouble with their cross head fastenings. The following is a extract from Wikipedia.

    Pozidriv

    [FONT=sans-serif][/FONT]
    [FONT=sans-serif]

    [/FONT]
    [FONT=sans-serif]The Pozidriv, sometimes misspelled Pozidrive, screw drive is an improved version of the Phillips screw drive. It is jointly patented by the Phillips Screw Company and American Screw Company. The name is thought to be an abbreviation ofpositive drive. Its advantage over Phillips drives is its decreased likelihood to cam out, which allows greater torque to be applied.[11][12][13] In ANSI standards it is referred to as type IA.[14] It is very similar to, and essentially compatible with, the Supadriv screw drive.[15][/FONT]
    [FONT=sans-serif]Phillips drivers have an intentional angle on the flanks and rounded corners so they will cam out of the slot before a power tool will twist off the screw head. The Pozidriv screws and drivers have straight sided flanks.[/FONT]
    [FONT=sans-serif]The Pozidriv screwdriver and screws are also visually distinguishable from Phillips by the second set of radial indentations set 45 degrees from the cross recess. The manufacturing process for Pozidriv screwdrivers is slightly more complex. The Phillips driver has four simple slots cut out of it, whereas in the Pozidriv each slot is the result of two machining processes at right angles. The result of this is that the arms of the cross are parallel-sided with the Pozidriv, and tapered with the Phillips.[/FONT]
    [FONT=sans-serif]This design is intended to decrease the likelihood that the Pozidriv screwdriver will slip out, provide a greater driving surface, and decrease wear.[11] The chief disadvantage of Pozidriv screws is that they are visually quite similar to Phillips, thus many people are unaware of the difference or do not own the correct drivers for them, and use incorrect screwdrivers. This results in difficulty with removing the screw and damage to the recess, rendering any subsequent use of a correct screwdriver unsatisfactory. Phillips screwdrivers will fit in and turn Pozidriv screws, but will cam out if enough torque is applied, potentially damaging the screw head. The drive wings on a Pozidriv screwdriver will not fit a Phillips screw correctly, and are likely to slip or tear out the screw head.[/FONT]
    Supadriv

    [FONT=sans-serif][/FONT]
    [FONT=sans-serif]The Supadriv (sometimes found incorrectly as "Supadrive") screw drive is very similar in function and appearance to Pozidriv—indeed, the two are often thought to be identical—and is a later development by the same company. The description of the Pozidriv head applies also to Supadriv. While each has its own driver,[16] the same screwdriver heads may be used for both types without damage; for most purposes it is unnecessary to distinguish between the two drives. Pozidriv and Supadriv screws are slightly different in detail; the later Supadriv allows a small angular offset between the screw and the screwdriver, while Pozidriv has to be directly in line.[15][17][/FONT]
    [FONT=sans-serif]In detail, the Supadriv screwhead is similar to Pozidriv but has only two identification ticks, and the secondary blades are larger. Drive blades are about equal thickness. The main practical difference is in driving screws into vertical surfaces: that close to a near vertical surface to drive the screws into the drivers, Supadriv has superior bite, making screwdriving more efficient, with less cam out.[/FONT]

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    Last edited by peva; 18 April 2012 at 14:33.

 

 

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