Welcome to the world of Saab ! Register
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    06 Jan 2017
    Location
    cyprus
    Posts
    8
    Saab(s)
    Saab Aero 93 2003
    Thumbs Up:   0

    Angry misfire on the engine white smoke and smelling gasoline

    Hello,

    I have a Saab Aero 93 2003 2.0 T. I have this problem for 1 month now and i dont no what to do. My car crack when i try to start it and smelling too much of gas white smoke for the exhaust pipe, also sometimes a misfire and running with 3 cylinder, I have chance the MAF sensor but nothing and also a new spark plugs.

    Any ideas?

    0 Not allowed!

  2. #2
    Saab Owner Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    28 Oct 2016
    Location
    Minneapolis Minnesota
    Posts
    348
    Saab(s)
    2006 9-3 SportCombi
    Thumbs Up:   81
    White smoke when running sounds like tea kettling, a sign of leaking coolant into the combustion chamber. What did the old spark plugs look like when you changed them?

    0 Not allowed!

  3. #3
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    06 Jan 2017
    Location
    cyprus
    Posts
    8
    Saab(s)
    Saab Aero 93 2003
    Thumbs Up:   0
    I take them out today and they are black.. i clean them and i put them back also the coolant level is prefect i dont lose any coolant. I dont remember the firt time what color the was..the new ones is 2 weeks old.

    0 Not allowed!

  4. #4
    Saab Owner Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    28 Oct 2016
    Location
    Minneapolis Minnesota
    Posts
    348
    Saab(s)
    2006 9-3 SportCombi
    Thumbs Up:   81
    Plugs should not be black, especially new plugs and fouling comes from fuel or oil. For smoke to be coming out the tailpipe past the catalytic converter, it has to be a big fuel or oil problem. Burning oil and black plugs in two weeks should show more color than white smoke and even a small coolant leak would clean up a plug to look like new, so white smoke with gas smell sounds like way to much fuel is being fed and raw gas is probably going down the pipe to the catalytic. You should have a check engine light if it's a sensor.
    Plug into your diagnostic port with an OBD2 reader that will read more than codes and look to see if the O2 sensors are working. Bad O2 sensors will tell the computer to send more gas than the engine can burn, bad fuel regulator will feed more gas than the engine can burn and it can leak fuel into the vacuum line.

    0 Not allowed!

  5. #5
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    06 Jan 2017
    Location
    cyprus
    Posts
    8
    Saab(s)
    Saab Aero 93 2003
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Ok i have put the car on the OBD2 and the code errors are P0246-00 - P0638-00 - P1682-00 - P 1312-00. I have cheak the O2 sensor and works fine. Also something my car start with misfire at the cylinder 1 i have change the coils and the same thing happen.

    0 Not allowed!

  6. #6
    Saab Owner Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    28 Oct 2016
    Location
    Minneapolis Minnesota
    Posts
    348
    Saab(s)
    2006 9-3 SportCombi
    Thumbs Up:   81
    When troubleshooting a problem like this by e-mail it can take weeks to learn on one end what can be seen in minutes on the other and the more information provided with the initial question the quicker you can get to the possible cause and fix. So if you ever need to ask a question like this again, remember to mention the check engine light and any codes in the first posting.

    The MAF sensor doesn't work like it should if it doesn't have the vacuum it should. Replacing the MAF didn't fix the problem and you have three codes that can be vacuum related. You need to inspect your vacuum lines with a good close visual, hands on, each line check, to make sure they are connected tight and not cracked. Also pull the vacuum line off the fuel pressure regulator, look and smell to see if it's been wet with gas, a vacuum leak isn't always a bad line, it can come from what the line connects to.

    You also need to clean your plugs and throttle body, you have a code that says you have crud, you can see the crud on the plugs and whether or not you also have crud in the throttle body, you might need to pull it off the intake to give it a good cleaning, you will need to make sure the butterfly isn't sticking before you can make this code go away.

    Not all vacuum leaks can be see with the naked eye and there is a check for leaks that I suggest be done by someone who knows what they are doing, but if you haven't found the problem by the time you have gotten this far you should have that done before you start looking at the things that cost money to replace.

    0 Not allowed!

  7. #7
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    06 Jan 2017
    Location
    cyprus
    Posts
    8
    Saab(s)
    Saab Aero 93 2003
    Thumbs Up:   0
    I take out today the fuel pressure regulator and clean it i find gazoline and is smeel strong also i clean my throttle body yesterday. About the vacum on the MAF how i will inspect them correctly? how i find them?

    0 Not allowed!

  8. #8
    Saab Owner Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    28 Oct 2016
    Location
    Minneapolis Minnesota
    Posts
    348
    Saab(s)
    2006 9-3 SportCombi
    Thumbs Up:   81
    One side of the fuel pressure regulator should have gas, the vacuum line side should never have gas, moisture or smell.

    The correct way to test vacuum and actuators is with a smoker, a gage and a pump, The poor mans way is to look at the lines and decide with your eyes and the feel of your hands if they are good or bad and use the feel of your fingers to test for vacuum with the engine running. When that fails the man without tools will spray a flammable around different connections when the engine is running. Not the safest thing to do!

    The poor mans vacuum test does not tell you when a check valve isn't working like it should, or if a solenoid valve isn't opening or closing to supply vacuum when it should. For this you will need to have the vacuum chart for your engine and if you are creative you can test all of this without the proper tools. Using your lungs to create vacuum is Not the safest thing to do! Use an air compressor and an angled T connect to create a vacuum.

    On this car testing for vacuum leak across the MAF is easy, slowly plug the main engine air intake. This should kill the engine and you should be able to hear where any big leak is. Finding all the little leaks can be a bit more difficult.

    No guarantee that a bad line is the cause of vacuum related problems as something as simple as a weak Cam Position Sensor can put your timing off far enough to leave the engine running without producing the vacuum needed to make everything run as it should. Best guess is a bad vacuum line connection, the car is 14 years old, turbos make a lot of heat under the hood and rubber doesn't last forever. One bad connect on a main vacuum line, pinched or open, can cause all these problems, it is the most likely cause and cost almost nothing to fix.

    0 Not allowed!

  9. #9
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    06 Jan 2017
    Location
    cyprus
    Posts
    8
    Saab(s)
    Saab Aero 93 2003
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Thank you very much for your help. My regulator smell gas in both side allso yhe way for vacum. I forgot to tell you that
    sometimes white skome come out from under the turbo the aera there..so maybe the vacum leak is around there. is all gomming together now. I will cheak the vacum leak better.

    0 Not allowed!

  10. #10
    Saab Owner Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    28 Oct 2016
    Location
    Minneapolis Minnesota
    Posts
    348
    Saab(s)
    2006 9-3 SportCombi
    Thumbs Up:   81
    Like working on plumbing in an old house, you find the small leaks after you fix the big leak.

    With gas on the vacuum side of the regulator it's time to replace the regulator. If it is your only problem it will fix the problem. Gas in the vacuum line goes into the engine, into the turbo and it can dissolve plastic vacuum check valves if it is in the system long enough and that can cause more problems so the sooner it gets replaced the better.

    0 Not allowed!

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT. The time now is 05:39.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.5
Copyright © 2017 vBulletin Solutions Inc. All rights reserved.