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  1. #1
    Saab Fan
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    Wagga Wagga NSW Australia
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    Saab(s)
    1998 95 Aero
    Thumbs Up:   2

    Starter motor replacement

    Hi There,
    I have a 1998 95 Aero 4 cylinder 2.3l.

    On a related matter to this thread, the ignition switch is no longer spring-loaded to ensure immediate return to the ON position after starting (when key rotational pressure ceases). It has been on my agenda to fix this for some time (I have got a second-hand replacement) but in the meantime have simply turned it off start position manually.
    Unfortunately today the starter motor jammed and failed to retract after starting. I could hear what sounded like the starter whirring with the engine running but when I checked the key position it was definitely bacl in the ON position. I was changing the coolant after replacing the heater bypass valve and assumed it must be a noisy timing chain.
    Then there was a slight bang and the noise disappeared, but the motor kept running. When I turned it off the starter no longer worked. Turn key to start - nothing happened (and windows wouldn't work). Initially I thought the timing chain had broken!!!. Disaster.

    Conclusion - dead but now disengaged starter. I can get a replacement for $120 which is not bad.

    Hence two questions:
    1. How do I remove the starter motor. I can't seem to find instructions on the forum.
    2. How do I sort out replacing the ignition starter/ return spring? This was likely a contributing factor to the starter motor jamming - probably because the engine was run at some time(s) with the starter still engaged.
    Regards
    Kangaroo1

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  2. #2
    Frank
    Administrator nordwulf's Avatar
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    30 Jul 2010
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    Saab(s)
    previous: 2006 9-3, 2001-06 9-5, 2011 9-4X
    Thumbs Up:   101
    Hello and welcome. I moved your post to a new thread. I never replaced the starter motor so I am not much help unfortunately.

    Here are the instructions from the Saab WIS: Saab_9-5_starter_motor_replacement_4-cylinder_WIS.pdf

    Doesn't seem to difficult but I am not sure how easy it is to access. Good luck and welcome to SaabWorld!

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  3. #3
    Saab Fan
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    Wagga Wagga NSW Australia
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    Saab(s)
    1998 95 Aero
    Thumbs Up:   2
    Thanks Nordwulf- it looks reasonably straightforward.
    Now just need the solution for replacing the ignition spring that returns the ignition to ON from Start once you relaese pressure on the key after the car has started.
    Regards
    Kangaroo1

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  4. #4
    Frank
    Administrator nordwulf's Avatar
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    Saab(s)
    previous: 2006 9-3, 2001-06 9-5, 2011 9-4X
    Thumbs Up:   101
    Perhaps the ignition cylinder just needs to be cleaned? Check out this thread for more info: http://saabworld.net/showthread.php?t=26395

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  5. #5
    mdb99@bellsouth.net
    Oh! I Get It Now Mike Brennan's Avatar
    Join Date
    21 Aug 2010
    Location
    Williamsburg, Va. and Cedar RIver Mi.
    Posts
    611
    Saab(s)
    01 95 Aero and Wagon, 09 93 Combi and an 08 95 Combi
    Thumbs Up:   11
    While you are in there, replace the oil sending unit as well. You wont regret it later when you won't have to do it with starter installed.

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  6. #6
    Saab Enthusiast
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    19 Jul 2015
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    Charlottesville, VA
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    Saab(s)
    1997 NG 900 SE
    Thumbs Up:   40
    You will need to put the front end on jack stands. Disconnect the battery first thing. Remove and/or move about what you need to to have access to the top mounting bolt, remove it from the top. Tight access under car, you may have to remove the manifold brace. Remove the lower mounting bolt, but before you remove starter, clip the tie that holds the oil pressure switch wiring to solenoid. Now comes the part that have me the most trouble, removing the cable and solenoid wires. That may take a while depending on how much slack you have. Once it's removed, you can decide if you want to replace the oil pressure switch, which will take a special tool, an oxygen sensor socket or crows foot, to remove. When reassembling, take care that the solenoid wires get reattached correctly. Not a difficult job, but for me, getting the cable off was the hard part due to no slack. Enjoy.

    Sent from my LG-K373 using Tapatalk

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  7. #7
    Saab Fan
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    Wagga Wagga NSW Australia
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    Saab(s)
    1998 95 Aero
    Thumbs Up:   2
    Thanks Southsaab,
    Much appreciated
    Regards
    Kangaroo1

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  8. #8
    Saab Fan
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    Wagga Wagga NSW Australia
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    Saab(s)
    1998 95 Aero
    Thumbs Up:   2
    Thanks again Nodwulf.
    The instructions appear very clear - will be interesting to pull it apart.
    Regards
    Kangaroo1

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  9. #9
    Saab Fan
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    Wagga Wagga NSW Australia
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    Saab(s)
    1998 95 Aero
    Thumbs Up:   2
    Thanks Mike - I will check it out. I assume that the Oil Sending Unit monitors the oil pressure?
    Regards Kangaroo1

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  10. #10
    Saab Fan
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    25 Jan 2017
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    Wagga Wagga NSW Australia
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    Saab(s)
    1998 95 Aero
    Thumbs Up:   2
    Thanks NordWulf and SouthSaab.

    Yesterday I replaced the starter motor on my 4cylinder 9.5.

    I commenced at 3-00pm (42C in Wagga Wagga so had to wait until the car was in the shade).

    Name:  IMG_0579 Saab Starter Top Bolt 1(FILEminimizer).jpg
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    1. Disconnected the battery

    2. removed the plastic cover over the inlet manifold. - 30 seconds.

    3. Located the top bolt on the Starter - see photos.

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    Name:  IMG_0575 Saab Starter Top Bolt 3(FILEminimizer).jpg
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    4. got out my socket set to discover there was no 18mm socket? Had 17, 17.5 and 19mm. Checked my spanners - no 18mm. Went next door and asked my truck driver mate - he had a big toolbox of ring spanners - no 18mm. He let me borrow the tool box - crucial.

    5. Drove down to Bunnings (big hardware store) and bought a complete set of Sidchrome ring spanners (top quality) $85 including 18mm plus an 18mm siocket $12.

    6. Got the ring spanner on the nut - parallel to the ground and reaching to the firewall. Couldn't budge the nut - not enough leverage.

    7. next tried the 18mm socket - only about 2cmm before the transmission case impedes from in front and only about 1cm clearance below the nut. Managed to find a ratchet socket wrench with a solid bar locking device and slim enough to fit into the space from a near vertical position.

    8. Disconnected the wiring connector (see Photo 3 above) that was in the way so it wouldn't be damaged. There are are a lot of hoses, pipes, wiring etc in the way but most are reasonably flexible and not prone to damage.

    9. Applied as much leverage as i could on the socket wrench (arm was about 22cm long) - but absolutely no effect on bolt.

    10. Decided I needed more leverage - went back to Bunnings and bought 0.9m of 26mm Galvanised water pipe (internal 20mm) which fitted over the arm of the socket wrench (after I removed the plastic grip).
    Pipe was too long to fit under the bonnet so cut it in two to 640mm (+ 260mm) with the angle grinder which then just squeezed in under the bonnet facing backwards at a 30 degree angle to the vertical.
    See photos - note this was not the socket wrench I ended up using because the head was too large to access the bolt.

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    Name:  IMG_0580 Pipe & Wrench 2(FILEminimizer).jpg
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    6. Applied steady and increasing pressure (huge leverage) and it finally squeaked a 10th of a turn. With the ratchet I was able to loosen it bit by bit and finally able to turn it using my fingers. The bolt is about 7cm long - Note for Later : it is worthwhile putting some lubricant on it and screwing it in to the replacement starter motor before trying to install it.

    7. The extra strong torque required to remove the bolt is probably because when the motor was replaced 2 years ago, they installed the starter motor with the engine on a stand - with much easier access with a torque wrench. They may also have put lock-tite on the bolt although I suspect not.

    8. It took me about 3 hours to get the top bolt out - I was now "on a roll" as they say!!
    .
    9. I now jacked up the car from the side using a trolley jack and placed wooden planks under the RHS wheel. Then jacked up the middle front and similarly put blocks under the LHS jacking point. Left the trolley jack in place but was now confident the car wouldnt fall on me.!!

    10 Access underneath is very limited. I put a plastic tarp on the driveway to facilitate sliding in and out - which I did about 50 times over the next 3 hours.

    11. Reaching up behind the engine I was able to feel and then see the lower mounting nut. I think it was 14mm from memory.

    12. Using the socket ratchet wrench with an extension connecter I managed to get the wrench poking down through the space where I could apply leverage - but the ratchet had too much distance between cogs and it wouldn't work in the limited space. I rifled through my mate's toolbox again and managed to find a socket wrench without a ratchet mechanism - it showed promise but I still couldnt get enough leverage. When I added the short length (260mm) of galvanised pipe the nut loosened easily - then was easily removed with my fingers.

    13 At this stage I decided I had better remove the main electrical terminal from the starter motor - easy to do with a ring spanner or socket. However, I made the mistake of not removing the nut on the seconday wire at the same time. Once the starer motor is out of the transmission it is extremely difficult to remove this nut as there is not enough room to hold the starter rigid and attack the nut at the same time! Eventually I approached it from above- jammed the starter motor against the motor/chassis enough to get a socket on the nut (you can't reach it with a spanner).

    14. I didnt need to remove or loosen the manifold brace.

    15. From there it was easy to lift the starter motor back from above and lift it out with a bit of manoevouring.

    Replacement
    1. Basically the reverse of the above - lower the starter from above seemed easier (as I had got it out that way). Need to get the back/solenoid around behind the manifold brace.

    2. Then from below use your fingers to line up the lower fixed bolt with the matching hole on the starter. Put the nut on - tighten with fingers but not too tight.

    3. Then insert the top bolt from above. Once you get it started in the thread use your fingers with jiggling to screw it in as far as possible. If the bottom bolt is done up tight this may be difficult. Then use the socket wrench to tighten it right up. Once again access is so limited that it is a very slow and tedious process.

    4. Then from below attach the main electrical wire and the secondary wire. Not too difficult (Easy in fact!!)

    5. Then tighten the bottom nut - using socket wrench (not ratchet) - once again very limited access.

    6 Put plastic tie around solenoid holding oil sensor wiring in place. I didn't replace the oil sensor - I hope it lasts forever!!

    7 Reconnect the electrical wiring connecter tthat was obstructing top access.

    8. Reconnect the battery.

    8. Lower the car.

    9. 7 hours later (10 o'clock at night) - I turned the key and the car started instantly. SUCCESS!!!!

    I reckon that with the tools and equipment I now have on hand, plus experience, I could probably do it in about 2 hours or less. it would be easier with a hoist - but when the car won't start (by definition) you either fix it at home where it stands or call the tow-truck and pay for the privilege!

    Cost $120 for starter motor, $30 shipping, $85 set of 13 ring spanners and $14 for 18mm socket (ongoing benefit), water pipe $13 - Total cost about $260.

    Thanks everyone for your advice,

    Regards
    Kangaroo1

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