Welcome to the world of Saab ! Register
Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 789
Results 81 to 87 of 87
  1. #81

    Join Date
    12 Feb 2016
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3
    Saab(s)
    2006 9-5
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Okay thanks. Just wasn't sure if I was supposed to remove the plug mentioned in the posting that I was referring to.

    0 Not allowed!

  2. #82
    Saab Enthusiast
    Join Date
    11 Sep 2011
    Location
    Sofia, Bulgaria
    Posts
    75
    Saab(s)
    9-5
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Quote Originally Posted by MI-Roger View Post


    The WIS instructions say the fluid level is to be between 49mm and 61mm below the upper surface of the case at the fill hole. This corresponds to between 2 and 2-1/2 inches for us metric challenged Americans. The image is of a Folding Carpenter's Rule with extension tang which will work for this purpose.
    The same, right? http://saabworld.net/showthread.php?t=2923

    0 Not allowed!

  3. #83

    Join Date
    12 Feb 2016
    Location
    Boston, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3
    Saab(s)
    2006 9-5
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Just thought I'd follow up and let you all know that I threw my car up on the lift yesterday and was able to drain the tranny fluid and refill it through my transmission dipstick even though it's an 06! Guess the previous owner maybe had the dealer install it perhaps? I recall reading about that somewhere, where it was some new sort of kit the dealers could install.

    0 Not allowed!

  4. #84

    Join Date
    24 Jul 2016
    Location
    Pa
    Posts
    1
    Saab(s)
    2002 9-3 Conv
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Thanks for the great description and pictures! In combination with the WIS instructions, I changed the fluid in my 2002 9-3 2.0T using the banjo bolt to allow a flush of the fluid in the torque converter. Three additional 'tools' made this work well. I picked up an aftermarket oil pan bolt (14mm - 1.50) from an autoparts store. There were many to choose from once I got on the right aisle (Advance Auto Part # 65253 was the one I used). This is used as a temporary plug in the transmission port where the oil cooler return line banjo bolt was attached. The second tool was a simple gallon kitchen pitcher (like the type used for iced tea) with quart and liter markings on the side and a cover. The cover was espeically nice to strain out the transmission drain bolt that I dropped when draining the initial sump. The last item was a piece of lay-flat plastic drain hose that I had lying around the house. The layflat is used to direct the flow of fluid from the disconnected banjo fitting to the collection pitcher. I pulled the layflat over the banjo fitting and wire wrapped it somewhat tightly to the hose above the fitting. This captured the fluid coming through the banjo fitting and directed it to the collection point.

    On my engine the return line connects to the transmission toward the front of the car from the transmission drain plug. There are two hoses that connect to the transmission. The return line is the one closest to the front of the car and slightly higher up. This is convinient as this is the banjo bolt that is most easily accessed.

    Here is the sequence that I used:
    1. Drained the sump as described in the first post (well written and easy to follow)
    2. Removed the return line banjo bolt from the transmission (more fluid will drain out but not much - maybe a pint or less). Fluid will also drain from the oil cooler section in the radiator if the banjo bolt is lowered down. I hooked it up slightly (an inch or two) just to stop the annoying intermittent drip at this point.
    3. Put the aftermart market 14mm-1.50 drain plug in the hole where the banjo bolt was removed.
    4. Removed the banjo bolt and washers from the hose, Get replacement washers if you can or be very careful in removing the washers as they have rubber inserts that could be torn. Remove the loose materials and gently clean the banjo bolt and washers - set aside for reistallation.
    5. Refilled the transmission through the dip stick with the volume of fluid removed by the initial drain and the fluid collected from the banjo bolt/.hose. Keeping track of all the removed fluid volumes will make the refill less trial and error.

    Note: At this point, the transmission has about four new quarts in the sump and three+ quarts of old fluid in the torque converter and other nooks & crannies.

    The next steps are the ones that may initially worry you but once started it will not be a problem:

    6. Place the layflat hose or whatever you have attached to direct the flow of fluid from the banjo hose connection to your catch container. This is where the kitchen pitcher works great. You are going to run the engine in PARK for about 30-60 seconds until approximately two quarts of old fluid have been collected.
    7. Brief your trusted helper that you are going to direct him to start the car (IN PARK only) and then turn it off on your call.
    8. Position yourself to watch the fluid catch container, start the engine (the fluid will start running out after 2-4 seconds) and when the container has slightly less than two quarts, stop the engine. Another cup or less fluid will run out. Transfer the fluid from the catch container. I collected the removed fluid in empty 5-quart oil jugs that I had. The jugs have quart markings on the side and made it easy to keep track of the total fluid removed.
    9. Add fluid to make up for the two quarts (more or less) that you pumped out.
    10. Do steps 8, 9 and 10 a second time. At this point you have added about eight quarts dsplacing an almost equal amount of oil fluid.
    11. I did one additional pumped drain of a little less than one quart but it was pretty clean looking red fluid at this pont.
    12. Put the banjo bolt and washers back on the banjo fitting (obviously after removing the plastic hose that was attached to direct the flow)
    13. Place a collection pan under the banjo bolt connection to the transmission and remove the temporary plug installed under Step #3. Fluid will drain out when this plug is removed at a low velocity (it's not going to gush). Reinstall the banjo bolt - it's more important to get it properly threaded in than to stop the leakage. You will simply add more fluid to make up for it in the final fill.
    14. Tighten the banjo fitting (torque to requirements if you have a torque wrench). Don't overtighten it as you can always tighten up after the engine is run. This is the sump area and is under minimal pressure (remember what is looked like when you were pumping it out - not real exciting pressure here).
    15. Add the final amount of fluid (should be around one quart + a little) so that you have now added the total number of quarts that were removed. I had collected all the fluid in two 5 quart oil containers and simple added the volume together for my final fill.

    After bringing the system up to temperature, my fluid level was mid-way between the min/max markings and I didn't need to make any additional adds.

    This took me a couple of hours but could probably be done in about 30-40 minutes total if I had known what I was doing.

    0 Not allowed!

  5. #85
    Saab Enthusiast AT ONE SIR's Avatar
    Join Date
    10 Jul 2013
    Location
    Seattle USA
    Posts
    124
    Saab(s)
    2001 9-5 Wagon 2.3T I4 (B235E)
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Contacted SAAB Original Club service via email and they told me "dex6" was the best modern atf for my 2001 9-5 wagon.

    I followed up asking for a specific brand they recommend and they said "AC Delco"



    I'm about ready to buy a case of the AC Delco Dexron VI. Anyone have any final recommendations or comments on the fluid choice for my SAAB?

    0 Not allowed!
    Last edited by AT ONE SIR; 19 November 2016 at 18:47. Reason: added link to SAAB Original Club
    2001 9-5 Wagon

  6. #86
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    31 Jan 2016
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    21
    Saab(s)
    2008 95 AERO
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Quote Originally Posted by MI-Roger View Post
    Draining ATF with on the '06 and newer cars.

    These cars do not use a dipstick or have a dip stick tube. Instead, the dip stick hole low on the case is filled with a threaded aluminum plug equipped with a T55 recess.

    NOT DRAIN YOUR ATF UNTIL YOU HAVE THIS PLUG OPENED!

    This plug is a challenge to remove, and draining your ATF before you have this plug removed might result in a dry transmission on a car that must now be towed to a Saab Tech for assistance.

    You will need the following tools to remove this plug: a T55 bit for a 3/8 socket wrench, a 3/8 stubby wobble bit, a 24-inch long 3/8 socket extension (stacking shorter lengths together will result in too much movement and slop, you will never get the plug removed) and a socket wrench.

    The T55 recess in the soft aluminum plug is shallow which will cause the bit to jump out. To counter this you MUST lean hard on the tool assembly to keep the bit in the plug recess. Unfortunately, leaning hard into the tool assembly reduces the arm strength you can develop to turn the stubbornly stuck plug. To get the additional strength I added a 3/8 to 1/2 adapter to the top of my tool assembly and used a extra long 1/2-inch socket wrench.

    It worked! You may want to order a new transmission plug when you are ordering the other parts and pieces needed for a 60K Major Interval Service. The T55 teeth in these plugs are so soft the plug can almost be considered a single use part.
    So with this all in mind, I pre-purchased a replacement plug. Old plug fully striped, and I can't get it out. I even bought a torx stripped removal set, no luck. I sprayed it down with PB blaster before hand, leaned on the damn thing, and turned oh so gently, and no luck. So now I'm really SOL. Any one have any ideas on how to get this thing out now?

    0 Not allowed!

  7. #87
    Saab Enthusiast AT ONE SIR's Avatar
    Join Date
    10 Jul 2013
    Location
    Seattle USA
    Posts
    124
    Saab(s)
    2001 9-5 Wagon 2.3T I4 (B235E)
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Part is AC Delco Dexron VI (10-9029). Planning on draining old fluid into an empty clear container and marking the volume, then putting the same amount of new fluid in another matching clear container then filling it up. Driving it a bit to check and then add a bit more if it needs it.

    I apologize for what seemed like a duplicate posts on this great tutorial, but I got pretty anxious about putting the incorrect fluid in the 2001 9-5 Saab Wagon. In the end, I read all the posts here and then went with the exact part number the SAAB Original service rep told me to use 10-9029 / 88861037. The odd thing about this part is that it is listed under the 97x 2005-2009 parts listing on thesaabsite. This is worrying.

    With the varied advice on the "correct" trans fluid for my car (even from "official" sources), I must say that I am very disappointed with the inability to get a straight answer on this. (3309, Redline, multiple ACDelco fluids).

    Hope it all works out.

    0 Not allowed!
    Last edited by AT ONE SIR; 1 Day Ago at 16:14. Reason: clarification of AC-Delco part#
    2001 9-5 Wagon

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Automatic transmission lock-up solenoid
    By SaabWorld in forum Tutorials, repairs and service
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20 February 2017, 15:46
  2. Saab 9-5 gear selector casing (automatic) - WIS
    By SaabWorld in forum Tutorials, repairs and service
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01 August 2016, 14:31
  3. Manual gearbox fluid change - Saab 9-5
    By SaabWorld in forum Tutorials, repairs and service
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 14 October 2010, 04:03

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT. The time now is 04:56.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2017 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.