Welcome to the world of Saab ! Register
Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 91011
Results 101 to 106 of 106
  1. #101

    Join Date
    02 Dec 2015
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    2
    Saab(s)
    1999 9-5 2.3L 2001 9-3 2.0L
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Quote Originally Posted by bryang View Post
    Hello. New to Saabs. Just purchased my first a 2000 Saab Aero Wagon, 5 speed Manual. I'm getting ready to do an alternator as I believe mine just went out and figured I'd address the sump while I'm dirty. I realize this is an older thread but hopefully someone can answer a question for me before I screw something up. I noticed in going through this thread, in post #6 it details dropping the sump on a manual car. I see the instructions call for transferring parts to a new sump and some drilling of holes. If I pull the sump I'll need to drill holes in the old one? I also see in the directions there appear to be some additional bolts that go in when replacing. Do I need to get these bolts/plugs (whatever they are) and a new sump to do this job? And, finally, who is a good parts source for Saab? Thanks for any advice / direction.
    bryang -

    on the aero with the manual there are two "hidden" bolts that you have to access sort of inside the flywheel cover... there are supposedly factory "punch outs" in the two spots that you can tap out (or in with all probability) with a hammer (ball peen hammer probably a good bet).

    here is a thread i found on another site that has a picture a guy took of where he drilled in. in principle the drilled areas are where you need to get in. so the factory weakened punch outs should be around there.

    if there are no punch outs readily observed, you can drill first in the areas with a small drill bit (pilot hole) then use a step bit to achieve the size hole you need to get your tool of choice into to work the bolts out.

    you do not have to swap parts over to new parts unless your pickup tube and screen are so badly damaged that they cannot be saved. however it is highly recommended to get all new o-rings for the pickup and it's pump connection (there are at least 2 you need minimum) and give everything a really good cleaning and put it back together and do your reinstall.

    EDIT:

    much better picture of the punch outs already removed on a car:

    http://uksaabs.co.uk/UKS/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=81540


    0 Not allowed!
    Last edited by waiving; 17 January 2017 at 02:23.

  2. #102
    Saab Enthusiast
    Join Date
    13 Jan 2017
    Location
    Boise, Idaho USA
    Posts
    57
    Saab(s)
    2000 9-5 Aero Wagon, 2006 Saab 9-3 SportCombi Aero
    Thumbs Up:   4
    Thanks for the info, much appreciated! That picture really helps. For some reason I thought that I was going to have to punch hopes in the sump and replace it. I wonder why they didn't punch these out at the factory? Anyway...it's looking like I might have to wait for it to warm up a bit before getting to the alternator. Garage is full and it's 2 degrees out now. Thanks again!

    0 Not allowed!

  3. #103
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    06 Oct 2013
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8
    Saab(s)
    2004 Saab 9-5
    Thumbs Up:   0

    Dropping Oil pan

    Hi Nordwulf,

    Thank you for the excellent instructions on this thread!! I'm dropping the oil pan as I need to access my piston #3 from underneath. I was having serious blow by from the oil dipstick, first smoke and then after a while oil was being forced out of there and obviously engine running real rough. Some research pointed to eithre teh head gasket or piston problem. I opened up the head and found part of piston 3 had chipped off. Surpsrisingly the bore seems fine. I was hoping it wa sjust the head!!

    From your instructions I'm not sure if you removed the front exhaust or did you? If I can remove the pan without taking the exhaust out it would be amazing as I'm having a hard time taking the exhaust out after loosening it from the turbo and the front bracket.

    BTW any tips on a thread replacing pistons?

    Thank you much!!

    0 Not allowed!

  4. #104
    Bruno
    Saab Addict swisssaabist's Avatar
    Join Date
    18 Nov 2016
    Location
    Cheeseland or TICTAC land
    Posts
    601
    Saab(s)
    9-5 ARC Wagon 2002 2 t auto engine B205E
    Thumbs Up:   56
    the complete detailed instructions is in the WiS, download it on tech pages here...

    0 Not allowed!

  5. #105
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    06 Oct 2013
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8
    Saab(s)
    2004 Saab 9-5
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Hi Swisssaabist,
    Thanks for replying.
    I was able to drop the exhaust without taking it out. The problem was the flange that goes on to the cobra has 3 studs and nuts. If the studs come out when you unbolt the top of the exhaust, there is enough clearance to drop the exhaust, push back and unhook from the rubber hangers. If only the nuts come out there isn’t enough clearance. So I used the ‘2 nut’ technique to get the studs out and voila!!! There is a ‘subframe’ just after the front exhaust, that needs to be removed so the exhaust can come down to ground in the front. The flexible piece of the exhaust allowed it to bend and hang. At least I think that it is ok, I’ll find out.
    I was able to drop the pan and it looks clean inside, no sludge. Had to jack up the tranny to allow the pan to come down. Now to push piston 3 from the botttom and replace it.
    This has been a fun project so far I have to say for someone who is not that experienced.
    Hopefully no setbacks in the homestretch. Fingers crossed.

    Quote Originally Posted by swisssaabist View Post
    the complete detailed instructions is in the WiS, download it on tech pages here...

    0 Not allowed!

  6. #106
    Saab Fan
    Join Date
    01 Jan 2016
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    10
    Saab(s)
    2000 9-5 Manual Aero
    Thumbs Up:   0
    Quote Originally Posted by waiving View Post
    bryang -

    on the aero with the manual there are two "hidden" bolts that you have to access sort of inside the flywheel cover... there are supposedly factory "punch outs" in the two spots that you can tap out (or in with all probability) with a hammer (ball peen hammer probably a good bet).

    here is a thread i found on another site that has a picture a guy took of where he drilled in. in principle the drilled areas are where you need to get in. so the factory weakened punch outs should be around there.

    if there are no punch outs readily observed, you can drill first in the areas with a small drill bit (pilot hole) then use a step bit to achieve the size hole you need to get your tool of choice into to work the bolts out.

    you do not have to swap parts over to new parts unless your pickup tube and screen are so badly damaged that they cannot be saved. however it is highly recommended to get all new o-rings for the pickup and it's pump connection (there are at least 2 you need minimum) and give everything a really good cleaning and put it back together and do your reinstall.

    EDIT:

    much better picture of the punch outs already removed on a car:

    http://uksaabs.co.uk/UKS/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=81540

    img
    Thank you very much for this post. Very helpful.

    I just want to resurrect this thread a little bit with a few clarifications:
    The knockouts are in the sump, just in a location that oil doesn't have access to, right? Or do you really have to make some holes for the oil to escape?
    What are the reinforcement plates called? I can't seem to find them anywhere.

    I hope to not have to drop the sump, but I want to be prepared for the worst case.

    0 Not allowed!

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Fuel Supply line Check Valve Question
    By photousa in forum Saab 9-5 (1998-2009)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 15 November 2010, 01:44

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT. The time now is 01:29.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.5
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions Inc. All rights reserved.